Large Brocks Mine Dummy

Discussion in 'Fireworks Nostalgia, Collectables And History' started by Richard Lane, May 21, 2017.

  1. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    IMG_0415.JPG IMG_0418.JPG IMG_0469.JPG IMG_0464.JPG Great recollections Bazza...great days...I've attached some Brocks rockets from my collection...I think they are the type you describe...I've got some wooden turned nose caps ..I'll photo and post them later today...hope they bring back memories!....
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2017
  2. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    IMG_3802.JPG IMG_3801.JPG Brocks Nose cones....all from around the period starting as long ago as 1890 until the 1970's.They measure 50 mm diameter x 32 mm to the tip.
    These are all turned by hand or machine possibly...but due to the very slight detail changes ...Hand work is the favourite.
    These are rare as the proverbial hens teeth!
     
  3. Jamie Thornton

    Jamie Thornton Supports UKFR

    Love the rockets Richard and wooden nose cones too, the old British rockets were proper rockets and couldn't be imitated anywhere else in the world, they are, were very pleasing to the eye unlike the awful Chinese stuff today.
     
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  4. Fantastic stuff, Richard! That Ruby Plume rocket is exactly as I remember, apart from the price on the label. I am sure that mine had a letter where yours has a price, and I think that the letter was 'L', but cannot be sure. I also had a nose-cap (from a smaller rocket) that was not hollowed out on the inside - the inner surface was turned flat. The caps from the larger rockets were just like those you have. The hub of the 10" Vertical Wheel was another nice example of the wood-turner's craft. It tapered at the back to make a sort of spindle so that there was minimal friction between the wheel and the supporting post. In support of your suspicion that these things were turned by hand, here is a picture of a fellow at a lathe at the old Sutton factory turning the wooden handles for ship's lights: Turning handles for ship's lights.jpg
    This picture is from page 106 of the Boy's Own Annual. vol. 54, 1931-1932, so it was probably taken not long before the move to Hemel Hempstead. Here is a picture of
    a wooden-handled ship's light made by Brock:

    Brock's Blue Light.jpg
     
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  5. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    Baz...that's very interesting indeed...love the photo of the lathe shop at Sutton...absolutely the case re hand turning.
    .....aaannnddd......I've got exactly the wooden wheel hub you mention...it's in my workshop stores..I'll look it out and send image of it tomorrow.
    The ships Light you pictured...that's really weird...I had exactly one of those when I was a child ...long gone now..shame...I'll post a Pains one tomorrow with the wheel hub detail......
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2017
  6. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    Jamie..how right you are...find 'proper' English rockets the very best ever...unique ...absolutely ..unique....:cheers:
     
  7. Jamie Thornton

    Jamie Thornton Supports UKFR

    Yep, just too right Richard, I have the standard large size 20 snowflake sky rocket, very beautifully made, the texture, the design just stunning:).
     
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  8. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    Bazza...Herewith the photos of the Pains ship distress rocket ...and the wheel hub as described in your post...and another hub from an old Wells fireworks Pidgeon wheel,that I've had for years and years.
    Used to send them back to Wells when discharged and they would send them back fully fledged again!..... IMG_3806.JPG IMG_3817.JPG IMG_3816.JPG IMG_3818.JPG
     
  9. Thanks Richard! Nice items! The hub on the wheel that I had was a little different in that the tapered spindle part was longer, so that there was much less wood left around the hole. Also there were only 4 spokes, where your much bigger wheel has 6, and there was no hole to receive a colour case as there is on yours. Interesting that Wells would re-cycle the woodwork of the Flying Pigeon.
     
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  10. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    Baz..yep this is a larger wheel..approx 500 mm diameter.
    Re the pidgeon..the philosophy was that the timber wheel was so expensive it was worth recharging time after time.
    Trustworthy times they were!..
     
  11. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    Jamie..Hi..yes spotted your Snowflake rocket on your recent post...smashing piece of kit...exemplifies Standard's Rocketry...
     
  12. Jamie Thornton

    Jamie Thornton Supports UKFR

    Thanks Richard, yes was thrilled to bits when I got it and is an integral part of my collection and a very favourite, yes a really lovely piece, a real work of art.
     
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  13. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

  14. Captain Caveman

    Captain Caveman Supports UKFR

    Hey guys, I remember buying an absolutely enormous “Size W” Brocks mine called “feu de joie” if I recall correctly, around 1988. It was an absolute monster, biggest firework in the shop and dwarfed even the Standard (Size 12) Groundmine.

    It fired fabulously as well; enormous burst of silver comets leaping incredibly high into the sky (after an initial fountain as per). No other effects, but we were all gobsmacked. Good job we were letting them off in a large field, definitely not one for the garden.

    I think it cost me around £8 which was a small fortune to pay for a single separate back them, but it was a fitting finale to the display and well worth the cash!