Old Technology - Blue Touchpaper

Discussion in 'Fireworks Nostalgia, Collectables And History' started by spectrum, Aug 30, 2014.

  1. jww

    jww Supports UKFR

    Hi, they are home made, but they're not dummies - further to Kevin's advice they're made so they can't be mistaken for the "real thing". That said, various materials, techniques etc have been considered - as you may know - I'm rather interested in the tech. side of things. It goes without saying that they're just cardboard, paper and glue - nothing else :) John.
     
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  2. fozzboy

    fozzboy Supports UKFR

    They look really Good... a credit to you
     
  3. Jamie Thornton

    Jamie Thornton Supports UKFR

    Very good, almost like the real thing.
     
  4. Escht

    Escht Supports UKFR

    3 versions of the real thing in my collection
    IMG_0889.JPG
     
  5. Tinderbox

    Tinderbox Pro Firer/Crew Supports UKFR

    They look absolutely splendid.

    You BTP really looks great.
     
  6. jww

    jww Supports UKFR

    So we know that pyro items were available in several sizes sometimes - the 9,12,15,20 for e.g. Std items such as rockets. Kevin's 3 x BOOM items tend to suggest that a specific item was a moveable feast in terms of spec - two dia of main tube and three of "spout" just for one item. So - it would be fascinating to know the origin of these variations? I would have thought keeping an item to a tight spec would be done to aid QA, costing, estimating, packaging etc. How would you measure? - e.g. what's a test for delay time if the delay mechanism varies so much? I suspect there is a *lot* more to the whole manufacturing undertaking than can be gleaned from the items themselves ?!? JW.
     
  7. Hello folks
    Stumbled on this forum whilst doing a 'falling down the google rabbit hole' ...so impressed i signed up and i'll do a proper intro later .This post however caught my eye regarding blue touchpaper
    I dont know if anyone has mentioned the connection to fruit (havent had time to read all 20 pages).....dont ask me how i know this because im unsure myself but i do remember when i was but a gangly youth myself and friends used to go to the rear of a fruit wholesalers near our school just to get the blue paper they used to wrap apples etc in....it was touchpaper and i was always under the impression that the paper was soaked in pot nit to act as a preservative and somebody found it had a dual purpose as a means of ignition ?
    Urban myth or fact ?...i honestly dont know
     
  8. Tinderbox

    Tinderbox Pro Firer/Crew Supports UKFR

    Find that one very hard to believe but hello and a warm welcome.
     
  9. jww

    jww Supports UKFR

    An interesting aside is the observation that a number of papers seem to smoulder quite a bit without the addition of - pyro type chemicals - so that's something I looked into - i.e. if it seems to smoulder well when untreated, is that a guide to better performance when dyed and with the addition of oxidiser. I guess the key observation re: the fruit wrapping is again the association of food packaging and blue dye - lots of historical e.g. here Revisited Myth #49: Early Americans used the blue wrappers from their sugar cones to dye fabric. | History Myths Debunked (wordpress.com) re: relationship and origin of blue in paper / sugar wrapping etc. John.
     
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  10. jww

    jww Supports UKFR

    Here's to 2021., BTP, English Mill made Black Powder, 4oz rockets, jumping jacks, helicopters, squibs and 4FA bangers...bring it on !!! - and good luck to all UK pyro folks :) John.
     
  11. fozzboy

    fozzboy Supports UKFR

    They had to make it Blue because it say's on Firework .. Light the Blue Touchpaper :D
     
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  12. Escht

    Escht Supports UKFR

    Simple answers are always the best.......;):)
     
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  13. Escht

    Escht Supports UKFR

    I always wonder exactly who Standard were aiming this warning at, if your daft enough to think you can hold a lit jumping jack you probably are best out of the gene pool anyway... message on fuze reads NOT TO BE HELD


    STANDARD 4 LOOP J JACK DO NOT HOLD.JPG
     
  14. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    B5A4DC1A-2EB1-4B3F-A106-32328FF1CA8D.jpeg And....this..in Ffffrench...reads..”Not to be held in the Mouth”..tsk..tsk..really wot about those Frenchies eh?!...
     
  15. fozzboy

    fozzboy Supports UKFR

    Spoil Sports :p
     
  16. jww

    jww Supports UKFR

  17. jww

    jww Supports UKFR

    Back to the issue of the interface between the BTP and the composition / prime. I recall safety campaigns used to include the issue of "never go back to once lit". Apart from the variable timing of BTP, I wander what % of items failed to light. Was it 0.5% or 0.001% !?! Also, I wonder if some items were more prone to failure? I'm doing some more investigation so shall report in as soon as more paper has been measured, cut, rolled, glued and so on :) John.
     
  18. Tinderbox

    Tinderbox Pro Firer/Crew Supports UKFR

    I racall a few over the years. If they were fountains they got lobbed into the fire. Quite a few bangers with the spout/spollette fuses failed. They went in the fire too. On the whole, I think it was fairly relaible unless it was raining. It which case forget it. At least visco is a lot sturdier but I do mus those BTP days.
     
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  19. jww

    jww Supports UKFR

    I'm *guessing* that the Std Banger type spout just had the powder bounced or rodded into it, and also depended on enough "bits of powder" being near the radiant heat and sparky splutter of the BTP to initiate things. We've previously covered that some e.g. aluminium fountains required a lump of prime / first fire splodged onto the BTP to ensure reliable ignition. Given that Bangers were at the cheapest end of the market, and aimed at the young, I guess that a fair % of failures were deemed acceptable and all part of the fun. Any insights welcome. John.
     
  20. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    Good summing up J....from memory of 50/60’s bangers the spout wasn’t splodge primed as far as I can recall...I guess that the makers relied on the close proximity of the BTP to the spout end to effect ignition..there’s a big ratio of BTP contact With the condensed end of the spout..R