Some of my Favorites

Discussion in 'Fireworks Nostalgia, Collectables And History' started by Richard Lane, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    IMG_4373.JPG IMG_5236.JPG IMG_4369.JPG IMG_2480.JPG IMG_5229.JPG IMG_4363.JPG IMG_4364.JPG IMG_4365.JPG IMG_4366.JPG IMG_4373.JPG IMG_5236.JPG IMG_4369.JPG IMG_2480.JPG
    Here is a selection of a few of my favourites!..Enjoy!
     
  2. jww

    jww Supports UKFR

    thanks for interesting pictures. Slightly off topic - I still think firework mines are under represented over the last couple decades in smaller shows ? As I once noted in firework magazine, the mine is the only item I can think of which has been everything from an indoor table top item ( joy-bom, "indoor firework" mine and similar ) right thru' to 5"+ professional items. I wonder if anybody knows of another device having similar breadth of coverage ? I often wonder if Std mines of the 50's etc. had more aggressive lift than the later items, which always seemed to waste the content to some extent due to their gentle action. This view party distorted by many years using commercial mines I guess. Again, thanks, for super pics...John. p.s. took me *years* to realize that tapered headings on big rockets could be inverted "cones" used in other devices. Not sure if this true, but have done a few investigations.
     
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  3. jww

    jww Supports UKFR

    Ponder - I wonder about assembly order for the mines - there is quite a bit of complexity - but assume they didn't push the fountain component in "last" ? - or did they fill the content, then the top disc ( with fountain inserted already ) used to close the top? Then the main label? Any insights welcome :) John.
     
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  4. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    John..Hi there..the order of assembly was :-
    1Filling the body of the mine with black powder and contents.
    2 Wrap the neck of the fountain with deco paper after having glued the Touch paper first...(very often blue touch was used to cover the whole neck of the fountain)
    3 Insert the fountain with top disc attached and seal.
    4 Stick down the top lid deco paper...edges turned down approx 1cm down the sides of the mine
    5 Wrap and stick the deco paper to the body of the mine turned up under the lower brim.
    6 Unless originally printed on the deco paper affix the label of contents and price or code to the front.
    That's about it...there maybe some local variations but by and large that's the method.
    Hope this helps
    Richard
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2020
  5. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    John hi there again… Reference mines and their use… And this may be apocryphal… But my feeling is that the loads employed by the likes of standard and Brocks et cetera during the 1950s were more powerful than the loads of today.

    I remember going to the firework displays as a child held in the Jephson Gardens in Leamington spa in which there used to be a display of mines arranged in a long row across the site with a 6 inc diameter mine..... about eight in number arranged evenly spaced ....standing on 4 foot stakes...each with a square stand pad on which the mine was placed ...by hand...no securing!...
    And lit by hand with a bloke running in from each end of the line with a port fire.Ah long gone great days!

    Re rocket heads..I've got several examples of these cardboard cones which I use occasionally in restoration projects.
     
  6. scoops

    scoops Pro Firer/Crew

    I remember going to a display as a kid of about 6 so mid 70's ISH and having a brown pants moment when an almighty boom hit me! No areial effect though so not sure if mine? Did they do ground maroons too? It's the only thing that comes close nowadays to the noise and pressure released...
     
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  7. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    Yes ground maroons were quite common..as a forinstance a lancework picture of a goose was lit up and it appeared to lay nice oval eggs...and with a ferocious bang..that's the ground maroon...at the end a square one appeared!!
    Great punctuation devices maroons!!o_O:D
     
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  8. danielpyronutter

    danielpyronutter Pro Firer/Crew Supports UKFR

    I've always wondered how those rockets without sticks are launched?
     
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  9. standard steve

    standard steve Supports UKFR

    from a catapult ! lol
     
  10. Pyro Pete

    Pyro Pete Forum Editor

    Great photos and fireworks Richard, thanks for sharing :)
     
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  11. jww

    jww Supports UKFR

    Fab information - thanks for that - I'll incorporate it into my "research" - again, amazing how much hand work and complexity in a shop firework - I think this is part of the appeal of collecting old shop fireworks - they're hand crafted items - each unique :) John.
     
  12. Escht

    Escht Supports UKFR

    I would have thought the fuze tube with base lift charge cover would go in first, into the lifting charge powder, then then the main contents packed around the tube followed by any extra wadding and last of all the top cover placed over the fuze tube......... having had to rebuild a couple of mines that the fuze tubes had been pulled out from I can't see how they could fill them correctly any other way......... if you try to insert the fuze tube into a pre filled case the tube won't go all the way down to the lift charge , well certainly not easily....
     
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  13. Escht

    Escht Supports UKFR

    general idea of nternal workings of a mine, in this case a small Standard example,
    STANDARD 10p MINE DECONSTRUCTED.JPG
     
  14. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    Kev...as i say there are variations but principally you can deal with the matter of the fountain and insert either way.
    If you consider that practically all mines don't have a vast amount of contents and the lift charge is mixed in as a general loose filling its not a problem to use either method.
     
  15. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    Thanks everybody for the 'Likes'...it's really gratifying to see that ancient pyro is still interesting to you chaps.
    Richard
     
  16. blackbat

    blackbat Pro Firer/Crew Supports UKFR

    I guess we're mostly of a certain age!
     
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  17. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    IMG_3636.JPG IMG_3637.JPG IMG_3638.JPG IMG_3639.JPG IMG_3643.JPG IMG_3646.JPG IMG_3649.JPG IMG_3651.JPG On the subject of mines here is one of the biggest ever.
    Originally they were produced as shop dummies for the biggest shops such as Hamleys in London and for the largest stockists countrywide.
    This model was unfilled ..as I say it's a shop dummy for display only.
    Brocks made several large mines of 4"-6" diameter for retail sale...I'm frankly not sure if this size ..as the photo..was ever made live...but knowing Brocks at that time I wouldn't be surprised!
    I found it in London a couple of years ago...bought from a solicitor who was clearing someone's estate ..who I subsequently obtained other pyro from.
    This mine features the classic Brocks 'Cometic' design wrap paper..the size you can gauge from the Guinness Can alongside....its BIG!....also the labels are of interest. The square price one has the classic Crystal Palace motif which was affixed after the wrap was completed....the other ...lower ..round one is rare inasmuch it was first used well before the War and sets this apart...and the Dummy sign..well self explanatory!
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
  18. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    IMG_3774.JPG On the subject of big Brocks mines...here is a photo of Mike and Bernie Winters...known to the older members of the Forum!..as Blackbat says "of a certain age!!.....and in the pram there are examples of Big Brocks Mines!
     
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  19. Richard Lane

    Richard Lane Supports UKFR

    On another note I've just found a brilliant TV programme on Pyro..It's:-
    On BBC ..it's called 'Lucy Worsley's fireworks for a Tudor Queen'...just go to iPlayer ..it's all about Elizabethan pyrotechny and the biggest display put on at Kenilworth castle for Elizabeth the First..goes into the details of how it was made..fabulous..I'm watching now!
     
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  20. Escht

    Escht Supports UKFR

    SCHNORBITZ :):)
     
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